Chuckanut Community Forest Master Plan

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Project Summary

The creation of a Master Plan for Chuckanut Community Forest, commonly known as Hundred Acre Wood, and the surrounding trails, open space, and conservation areas in southern Bellingham, is currently underway. The Chuckanut Community Forest is located in south Bellingham between Fairhaven Park, the Interurban Trail, and Arroyo Park. The intent of the Chuckanut Community Forest Master Plan (Plan) is to create a dynamic, long-lasting plan that will set priorities and strategies to guide the future of the community forest. The final Plan will also include relevant history and existing conditions of the community forest, both environmental and recreational, and identify areas that may be in need of restoration and preservation.

Following the acquisition of 82 acres by the Greenways Program, a conservation easement between the Chuckanut Community Forest Park District and the City of Bellingham was established. The conservation easement is intended to protect the property in perpetuity and ensure that any future projects to enhance recreational and educational elements of the park do not negatively impact significant environmental features or conservation values.



Master Planning Process

A steering committee has been established with representatives from surrounding neighborhoods, Park District board members, Park Board, City staff, and recreational user groups. The planning process will include a variety of public engagement opportunities, including interactive surveys, self-guided tours, and an open house. Final Plan adoption will include Park Board review and City Council approval.

Why Now?

Defining the goals for future uses of the park through the adoption of this Plan is a responsibility listed in the conversation easement for the Chuckanut Community Forest. The City of Bellingham is committed to creating a Plan prior to the dissolution of the Chuckanut Community Forest Park District in conjunction with the repayment of the loan used to purchase the property.

Park Description & History

This planning effort includes the Chuckanut Community Forest along with surrounding open space areas, trails, and parks. The actual Plan boundary will be established through public process. A large majority of the area is covered by native mature coniferous forest intermixed with wetlands. Various native plant and animal species rely on the area for native habitat and habitat corridors for migration through an urban setting. Due to the many trails in the area and various connections to parks and neighborhoods, many people visit the forest for recreational purposes.

Native tribes are believed to have established camps along the nearby Chuckanut Bay, which is close enough to assume the forest area was explored for food and resources by these native peoples. The forest has seen minimal disturbances other than when the forest was harvested for timber and two gravel extraction sites were established. These activities have left behind remnants of old logging roads and gravel pits that have since been overtaken by vegetation. Now, there are several trails winding through the forest for people to wander and enjoy.


Project Summary

The creation of a Master Plan for Chuckanut Community Forest, commonly known as Hundred Acre Wood, and the surrounding trails, open space, and conservation areas in southern Bellingham, is currently underway. The Chuckanut Community Forest is located in south Bellingham between Fairhaven Park, the Interurban Trail, and Arroyo Park. The intent of the Chuckanut Community Forest Master Plan (Plan) is to create a dynamic, long-lasting plan that will set priorities and strategies to guide the future of the community forest. The final Plan will also include relevant history and existing conditions of the community forest, both environmental and recreational, and identify areas that may be in need of restoration and preservation.

Following the acquisition of 82 acres by the Greenways Program, a conservation easement between the Chuckanut Community Forest Park District and the City of Bellingham was established. The conservation easement is intended to protect the property in perpetuity and ensure that any future projects to enhance recreational and educational elements of the park do not negatively impact significant environmental features or conservation values.



Master Planning Process

A steering committee has been established with representatives from surrounding neighborhoods, Park District board members, Park Board, City staff, and recreational user groups. The planning process will include a variety of public engagement opportunities, including interactive surveys, self-guided tours, and an open house. Final Plan adoption will include Park Board review and City Council approval.

Why Now?

Defining the goals for future uses of the park through the adoption of this Plan is a responsibility listed in the conversation easement for the Chuckanut Community Forest. The City of Bellingham is committed to creating a Plan prior to the dissolution of the Chuckanut Community Forest Park District in conjunction with the repayment of the loan used to purchase the property.

Park Description & History

This planning effort includes the Chuckanut Community Forest along with surrounding open space areas, trails, and parks. The actual Plan boundary will be established through public process. A large majority of the area is covered by native mature coniferous forest intermixed with wetlands. Various native plant and animal species rely on the area for native habitat and habitat corridors for migration through an urban setting. Due to the many trails in the area and various connections to parks and neighborhoods, many people visit the forest for recreational purposes.

Native tribes are believed to have established camps along the nearby Chuckanut Bay, which is close enough to assume the forest area was explored for food and resources by these native peoples. The forest has seen minimal disturbances other than when the forest was harvested for timber and two gravel extraction sites were established. These activities have left behind remnants of old logging roads and gravel pits that have since been overtaken by vegetation. Now, there are several trails winding through the forest for people to wander and enjoy.


  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.

    The creation of an effective Master Plan depends on accurate input from the public. We appreciate your interest and participation. 

    This survey contains questions about the boundary and official name of the planning area, access preferences, and current and future uses. The results will inform the final master plan. This survey will take approximately five to ten minutes to complete.

    *BONUS: Please use the "Show us on the map!" tool to provide additional suggestions regarding locations that are recreational attractions, restoration opportunities, unique environmental features, or otherwise significant to you.

    Take Survey
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Page last updated: 11 October 2021, 15:33